As the summer sun beckons us outdoors, many of us eagerly dive into our favorite sports and activities. Whether you're hitting the basketball court, shredding on a skateboard, or joining a local soccer league, it's essential to consider not just your overall safety, but also the protection of your teeth and gums. In this blog post, we'll explore the importance of wearing mouthguards during summer sports and provide guidance on choosing the right one for your needs. The Hidden Dangers to Your Smile Summer sports often involve fast-paced action, physical contact, and the potential for falls or collisions. While we're quick to don helmets, knee pads, or other protective gear, many of us overlook the vulnerability of our mouths. According to the American Dental Association, athletes who don't wear mouthguards are 60 times more likely to suffer dental injuries than those who do. These injuries can range from chipped or broken teeth to more severe trauma like tooth loss or jaw fractures. Common summer activities that benefit from mouthguard use include: 1. Basketball 2. Soccer 3. Baseball and softball 4. Skateboarding and rollerblading 5. Cycling 6. Volleyball 7. Martial arts Even non-contact sports can pose risks. A fall from a...
When was the last time you visited the dentist for a routine check-up and cleaning? If it's been more than six months, you're long overdue. While some people view dental appointments as an inconvenient chore, getting consistent preventive care is crucial for maintaining good oral health throughout your life. Regular check-ups allow your dentist to monitor your mouth for any potential problems and catch issues early before they progress into something more serious and painful - not to mention more costly to treat. From preventing cavities and gum disease to detecting oral cancer, here's why making (and keeping) those twice-yearly dental visits should be a priority. Cavity Prevention and Early Detection One of the main reasons to see your dentist regularly is to have your teeth professionally cleaned and checked for cavities or dental caries. Even with diligent brushing and flossing at home, hardened plaque (tartar) still accumulates and needs to be removed. Left unchecked, this buildup provides an ideal environment for decay-causing bacteria to thrive and produce enamel-eroding acids. During a dental exam, your dentist or hygienist will use a small dental mirror and spiked instrument to check all surfaces of your teeth. If they spot any suspicious soft...