When buying food for the house, if you’re not paying attention to the products and beverages you’re purchasing, a simple trip to the grocery store could lead to a pantry stocked with acidic foods that can be harmful for your teeth. As great as candies, sodas, and citric fruits taste, they can actually end up doing your mouth more harm than good. In this article, we’re going to explore the damaging effects acids have on enamel and how to protect the dental health of your whole family with a few simple steps. What is Enamel and How Does Acid Affect It? Enamel is the outermost protective shell that covers your teeth and it’s the hardest most highly mineralized substance in the body (even more so than bones!). The role that enamel plays in the mouth is to protect the inner layers of teeth from damaging effects caused by acids and plaque. As an added protective measure to prevent enamel from becoming damaged, dentists also apply sealant around the chewing surfaces, although it doesn’t protect areas of the tooth that sealant won’t reach, allowing sodas and sticky candies to cause decay. When left on the teeth, acids can cause erosion which...
Finding the right dentist is an important part of making sure your dental health is where it needs to be, year after year. During the search, you may have noticed that some dentists have a DMD title, and others have a DDS title. If you’re like most, you’re probably wondering what the difference is and whether or not it should impact your selection. To help ease your mind, in this article, we’re going to clear up the confusion between these two degrees and explore the interesting history between them. To start, let’s first look at what they stand for and how they’re obtained. Solving the DDS and DMD Confusion Because they have different abbreviations and titles, many patients assume that each degree falls under a different specialty. While DDS stands for “Doctor of Dental Surgery”, DMD stands for “Doctor of Medicine in Dentistry”. To get either, dentists must go through three or more years of undergraduate college, four years of dental school, and then pass both a written national exam and a state or regional licensing exam. As it turns out, the American Dental Association says that there is no difference between the two degrees. Each simply means the doctor...